From the Campaign Trail

posted May 28

It’s hard to know where to start when Trump denies the drought, claims that environmentalists are “shoving all the water out to the ocean,” and promises that he will “turn the water back on” for those in the San Joaquin Valley who have had cutbacks in water deliveries.  I’m tempted to explain that according to the CA Water Board, only a tiny fraction of the central valley’s runoff has flowed through the Delta solely for environmental purposes the past several years; or that outflows are necessary to push saltwater out of the system so that millions of people can keep using water from the Delta; or that simply giving more water to San Joaquin Valley irrigators would require preempting state law and stealing water from other regions…  but I’m reminded of Mark Twain’s quote:  “Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference.”

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/onpolitics/2016/05/28/donald-trump-tells-californians-there-no-drought/85082174/

Corrections & Clarifications: An earlier version of this article misstated the name of California’s governor.

posted May 28

I don’t want to be an alarmist, but it is a fact that Zika is a real and growing public health threat - potentially greater than the Ebola crisis.  Yet the GOP majority in Congress is dithering while our public health response lags and the crisis in Puerto Rico—where thousands are predicted to contract Zika over the next year—demands federal action.  As many of us said at a rally on the Capitol steps Thursday, Congress must start doing its job!

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2016/05/27/congress-leaves-town-with-no-zika-resolution-lengthy-negotiations-ahead/?wpmm=1&wpisrc=nl_politics

Despite warnings from public health officials, Zika deal stuck in budget fight.

posted May 28

Illegal campaign signs are popping up again in Marin—on public medians and public rights of way instead of on private property where the owner has given permission to post them.  First-time candidates can generally put these up and replace them faster than our understaffed public works teams can remove them, but it doesn’t make it right and Marin voters get it—they know it’s a “sign” that someone lacks community support and flouts the law.  (The one exception is Novato, which allows some public spaces to be used for campaign signs).  Whether in the crowded race for judge or in my own race for Congress, I hope candidates will clean up their act and follow the rules.


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